Classical Studies

Christopher L. Caterine is an expert in Roman epic and ancient historiography, and has a special fondness for places where the two intersect.  After completing his undergraduate degree at Georgetown, he did his master’s and doctoral work at UVA.  His MA thesis was a study of references to Rome in Arrian’s Anabasis, written under the guidance of John Dillery.  His doctoral dissertation, written under Greg Hays, explored how ambiguities and contradictions in the narrative of Lucan’s Bellum Civile are used to create feelings of apprehension and anxiety in the poem’s audience.  This work spawned an article that was published by the peer-reviewed journal Arethusa in October 2015, and led to another project–still in progress–that considers instances in which the poem’s narrator praises those who can live without anxiety about the future (the implication that we are meant to be miserable while reading the poem is to his mind as close as we can come to a smoking gun of authorial intent).  He is also in the process of writing a chapter on Bellum Civile 5 for a volume Paul Roche is assembling as a sister work to Christine Perkell’s Reading Vergil’s Aeneid: An Interpretive Guide.

As a graduate fellow at UVA, Chris taught or served as a teaching assistant for courses in Latin language, Roman civilization, Greek myth, and Roman history.  He was awarded the Classics Department’s Outstanding Graduate Teaching Assistant Award in 2012, an honor the faculty bestows just once every three years.  At Tulane he has taught in-translation courses on Roman history and Classical Epic, as well as an advanced Latin seminar on Cicero and Sallust and a graduate course on Vergil’s Aeneid.  Courses he has devised but never taught include “Sons of Romulus,” a seminar on Roman historians of civil war, and “Friends before Facebook,” an introductory course on how friendships were envisioned, formed, and maintained in the Greek and Roman worlds.